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English National Opera (ENO) is an opera company based in London, resident at the London Coliseum (pictured). Its productions are sung in English. The company’s origins were in the late 19th century, when the philanthropist Emma Cons, later assisted by her niece Lilian Baylis, presented theatrical and operatic performances at the Old Vic in a rough area of London for the benefit of local people. Baylis acquired and rebuilt Sadler’s Wells theatre in north London, which was better suited to opera than the Old Vic. The opera company grew there into a permanent ensemble in the 1930s and, after expansion required a move to the Coliseum in 1968, adopted its present name in 1974. Conductors associated with the company include Colin Davis, Reginald Goodall, Charles Mackerras, Mark Elder and Edward Gardner. ENO is known for its emphasis on the dramatic aspect of opera, with productions, sometimes controversial, by directors including David Pountney, Jonathan Miller, Nicholas Hytner, Phyllida Lloyd and Calixto Bieito. In addition to the core operatic repertoire, ENO has presented a wide range of works, from early operas by Monteverdi to new commissions, operetta and Broadway shows. (Full article…)

English National Opera (ENO) is an opera company based in London, resident at the London Coliseum (pictured). Its productions are sung in English. The company’s origins were in the late 19th century, when the philanthropist Emma Cons, later assisted by her niece Lilian Baylis, presented theatrical and operatic performances at the Old Vic in a rough area of London for the benefit of local people. Baylis acquired and rebuilt Sadler’s Wells theatre in north London, which was better suited to opera than the Old Vic. The opera company grew there into a permanent ensemble in the 1930s and, after expansion required a move to the Coliseum in 1968, adopted its present name in 1974. Conductors associated with the company include Colin Davis, Reginald Goodall, Charles Mackerras, Mark Elder and Edward Gardner. ENO is known for its emphasis on the dramatic aspect of opera, with productions, sometimes controversial, by directors including David Pountney, Jonathan Miller, Nicholas Hytner, Phyllida Lloyd and Calixto Bieito. In addition to the core operatic repertoire, ENO has presented a wide range of works, from early operas by Monteverdi to new commissions, operetta and Broadway shows. (Full article…)

Drymoreomys is a genus of rodents in the tribe Oryzomyini from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. The single species, D. albimaculatus, is known only from the states of São Paulo and Santa Catarina and was not named until 2011. It lives in the humid forest on the eastern slopes of the Serra do Mar and perhaps reproduces year-round. Although its range is relatively large and includes some protected areas, it is patchy and threatened, and the discoverers recommend that the animal be considered “Near Threatened" on the IUCN Red List. Within Oryzomyini, Drymoreomys appears to be most closely related to Eremoryzomys from the Andes of Peru, a biogeographically unusual relationship. With a body mass of 44–64 g (1.6–2.3 oz), Drymoreomys is a medium-sized rodent with long fur that is orange to reddish-buff above and grayish with several white patches below. The pads on the hindfeet are very well developed and there is brown fur on the upper sides of the feet. The tail is brown above and below. The front part of the skull is relatively long and the ridges on the braincase are weak. The palate is short, with its back margin between the third molars. Several traits of the genitals are not seen in any other oryzomyine. (Full article…)

Drymoreomys is a genus of rodents in the tribe Oryzomyini from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. The single species, D. albimaculatus, is known only from the states of São Paulo and Santa Catarina and was not named until 2011. It lives in the humid forest on the eastern slopes of the Serra do Mar and perhaps reproduces year-round. Although its range is relatively large and includes some protected areas, it is patchy and threatened, and the discoverers recommend that the animal be considered “Near Threatened" on the IUCN Red List. Within Oryzomyini, Drymoreomys appears to be most closely related to Eremoryzomys from the Andes of Peru, a biogeographically unusual relationship. With a body mass of 44–64 g (1.6–2.3 oz), Drymoreomys is a medium-sized rodent with long fur that is orange to reddish-buff above and grayish with several white patches below. The pads on the hindfeet are very well developed and there is brown fur on the upper sides of the feet. The tail is brown above and below. The front part of the skull is relatively long and the ridges on the braincase are weak. The palate is short, with its back margin between the third molars. Several traits of the genitals are not seen in any other oryzomyine. (Full article…)

Bastion is an action role-playing video game produced by independent developer Supergiant Games. In the game, the player controls “the Kid” as he moves through floating, fantasy-themed environments collecting special shards of rock to power a structure, the Bastion, in the wake of an apocalyptic event. It features a dynamic voiceover from a narrator, and is presented as a two-dimensional game with an isometric camera and a hand-painted, colorful art style. The game debuted at the September 2010 Penny Arcade Expo, and it went on to be nominated for awards at the 2011 Independent Games Festival and win awards at the Electronic Entertainment Expo prior to release in July 2011. During 2011, the game sold more than 500,000 copies, 200,000 of which were for the Xbox Live Arcade. It was widely praised by reviewers, primarily for its story, art direction, narration, and music, although opinions were mixed on the depth of the gameplay. Bastion has won many nominations and awards since its release, including several for best downloadable game and best music. The soundtrack was produced and composed by Darren Korb, and a soundtrack album was made available for sale in August 2011. (Full article…)

Bastion is an action role-playing video game produced by independent developer Supergiant Games. In the game, the player controls “the Kid” as he moves through floating, fantasy-themed environments collecting special shards of rock to power a structure, the Bastion, in the wake of an apocalyptic event. It features a dynamic voiceover from a narrator, and is presented as a two-dimensional game with an isometric camera and a hand-painted, colorful art style. The game debuted at the September 2010 Penny Arcade Expo, and it went on to be nominated for awards at the 2011 Independent Games Festival and win awards at the Electronic Entertainment Expo prior to release in July 2011. During 2011, the game sold more than 500,000 copies, 200,000 of which were for the Xbox Live Arcade. It was widely praised by reviewers, primarily for its story, art direction, narration, and music, although opinions were mixed on the depth of the gameplay. Bastion has won many nominations and awards since its release, including several for best downloadable game and best music. The soundtrack was produced and composed by Darren Korb, and a soundtrack album was made available for sale in August 2011. (Full article…)

The reception history of Jane Austen follows a path from modest fame to wild popularity; her novels are both the subject of intense scholarly study and the centre of a diverse fan culture. Austen, the author of such works as Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1815), is one of the best-known and widely read novelists in the English language. During her lifetime, Austen’s novels brought her little personal fame; like many women writers, she published anonymously. At the time they were published, her works were considered fashionable by members of high society but received few positive reviews. By the mid-19th century, her novels were admired by members of the literary elite, but it was not until the 1940s that Austen was widely accepted in academia as a “great English novelist”. The second half of the 20th century saw a proliferation of scholarship exploring artistic, ideological and historical aspects of her works. As of the early 21st century, Austen fandom supports an industry of printed sequels and prequels as well as television and film adaptations, which started with the 1940 Pride and Prejudice and includes the 2004 Bollywood-style production Bride and Prejudice. (Full article…)

The reception history of Jane Austen follows a path from modest fame to wild popularity; her novels are both the subject of intense scholarly study and the centre of a diverse fan culture. Austen, the author of such works as Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1815), is one of the best-known and widely read novelists in the English language. During her lifetime, Austen’s novels brought her little personal fame; like many women writers, she published anonymously. At the time they were published, her works were considered fashionable by members of high society but received few positive reviews. By the mid-19th century, her novels were admired by members of the literary elite, but it was not until the 1940s that Austen was widely accepted in academia as a “great English novelist”. The second half of the 20th century saw a proliferation of scholarship exploring artistic, ideological and historical aspects of her works. As of the early 21st century, Austen fandom supports an industry of printed sequels and prequels as well as television and film adaptations, which started with the 1940 Pride and Prejudice and includes the 2004 Bollywood-style production Bride and Prejudice. (Full article…)

Aldfrith was king of Northumbria from 685 until his death on 14 December 704 or 705. He is described by early writers such as Bede, Alcuin and Stephen of Ripon as a man of great learning. Some of his works and some letters written to him survive. His reign was relatively peaceful, marred only by disputes with Bishop Wilfrid, a major figure in the early Northumbrian church. Aldfrith was born on an uncertain date to Oswiu of Northumbria and an Irish princess named Fín. Oswiu later became King of Northumbria; he died in 670 and was succeeded by his son Ecgfrith. Aldfrith was educated for a career in the church and became a scholar. However, in 685, when Ecgfrith was killed at the battle of Nechtansmere, Aldfrith was recalled to Northumbria, reportedly from the Hebridean island of Iona, and became king (coin pictured). In his early-eighth-century account of Aldfrith’s reign, Bede states that he “ably restored the shattered fortunes of the kingdom, though within smaller boundaries”. His reign saw the creation of works of Hiberno-Saxon art such as the Lindisfarne Gospels and the Codex Amiatinus, and is often seen as the start of Northumbria’s Golden Age. (Full article…)

Aldfrith was king of Northumbria from 685 until his death on 14 December 704 or 705. He is described by early writers such as Bede, Alcuin and Stephen of Ripon as a man of great learning. Some of his works and some letters written to him survive. His reign was relatively peaceful, marred only by disputes with Bishop Wilfrid, a major figure in the early Northumbrian church. Aldfrith was born on an uncertain date to Oswiu of Northumbria and an Irish princess named Fín. Oswiu later became King of Northumbria; he died in 670 and was succeeded by his son Ecgfrith. Aldfrith was educated for a career in the church and became a scholar. However, in 685, when Ecgfrith was killed at the battle of Nechtansmere, Aldfrith was recalled to Northumbria, reportedly from the Hebridean island of Iona, and became king (coin pictured). In his early-eighth-century account of Aldfrith’s reign, Bede states that he “ably restored the shattered fortunes of the kingdom, though within smaller boundaries”. His reign saw the creation of works of Hiberno-Saxon art such as the Lindisfarne Gospels and the Codex Amiatinus, and is often seen as the start of Northumbria’s Golden Age. (Full article…)

Bronwyn Oliver (1959–2006) was an Australian sculptor, whose works were primarily made in metal. Raised in rural New South Wales, she trained at Sydney’s College of Fine Arts (COFA) and London’s Chelsea School of Art. She settled in Sydney, where she practised and taught until her death by suicide in 2006. Oliver’s sculptures are admired for their tactile nature, their aesthetics, and the technical skills demonstrated in their production. In her later career, most of her pieces were commissions, both public and private. Her major works include Vine, a 16.5-metre high (54 ft) sculpture in the Sydney Hilton, Palm (pictured) and Magnolia in the Sydney Botanical Gardens, and Big Feathers in Brisbane’s Queen Street Mall. Recognition of her work included selection as a finalist in the inaugural Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award in 2000, inclusion in the National Gallery of Australia's 2002 National Sculpture Prize exhibition, and being shortlisted for the 2006 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award. Her works are held in major Australian collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales. (Full article…)

Bronwyn Oliver (1959–2006) was an Australian sculptor, whose works were primarily made in metal. Raised in rural New South Wales, she trained at Sydney’s College of Fine Arts (COFA) and London’s Chelsea School of Art. She settled in Sydney, where she practised and taught until her death by suicide in 2006. Oliver’s sculptures are admired for their tactile nature, their aesthetics, and the technical skills demonstrated in their production. In her later career, most of her pieces were commissions, both public and private. Her major works include Vine, a 16.5-metre high (54 ft) sculpture in the Sydney Hilton, Palm (pictured) and Magnolia in the Sydney Botanical Gardens, and Big Feathers in Brisbane’s Queen Street Mall. Recognition of her work included selection as a finalist in the inaugural Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award in 2000, inclusion in the National Gallery of Australia's 2002 National Sculpture Prize exhibition, and being shortlisted for the 2006 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award. Her works are held in major Australian collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales. (Full article…)

Pinguicula moranensis is a perennial rosette-forming insectivorous herb native to Mexico and Guatemala. A species of butterwort, it forms summer rosettes of flat, succulent leaves up to 10 centimeters (4 in) long, which are covered in mucilaginous (sticky) glands that attract, trap, and digest arthropod prey. Nutrients derived from the prey are used to supplement the nutrient-poor substrate in which the plant grows. In the winter the plant forms a non-carnivorous rosette of small, fleshy leaves that conserves energy while food and moisture supplies are low. Single pink, purple, or violet flowers appear twice a year on upright stalks up to 25 centimeters (10 in) long. The species was first collected by Humboldt and Bonpland on the outskirts of Mina de Morán in the Sierra de Pachuca of the modern-day Mexican state of Hidalgo on their Latin American expedition of 1799–1804. Based on these collections, Humboldt, Bonpland and Carl Sigismund Kunth described this species in Nova Genera et Species Plantarum in 1817. It remains the most common and most widely distributed member of the Section Orcheosanthus, and has long been cultivated for its carnivorous nature and attractive flowers. (Full article…)

Pinguicula moranensis is a perennial rosette-forming insectivorous herb native to Mexico and Guatemala. A species of butterwort, it forms summer rosettes of flat, succulent leaves up to 10 centimeters (4 in) long, which are covered in mucilaginous (sticky) glands that attract, trap, and digest arthropod prey. Nutrients derived from the prey are used to supplement the nutrient-poor substrate in which the plant grows. In the winter the plant forms a non-carnivorous rosette of small, fleshy leaves that conserves energy while food and moisture supplies are low. Single pink, purple, or violet flowers appear twice a year on upright stalks up to 25 centimeters (10 in) long. The species was first collected by Humboldt and Bonpland on the outskirts of Mina de Morán in the Sierra de Pachuca of the modern-day Mexican state of Hidalgo on their Latin American expedition of 1799–1804. Based on these collections, Humboldt, Bonpland and Carl Sigismund Kunth described this species in Nova Genera et Species Plantarum in 1817. It remains the most common and most widely distributed member of the Section Orcheosanthus, and has long been cultivated for its carnivorous nature and attractive flowers. (Full article…)

Skye is the largest island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Its peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country. The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic period and its history includes a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by Clan MacLeod (Dunvegan Castle, the clan’s seat, pictured) and Clan Donald. The 18th-century Jacobite risings led to the breaking up of the clan system and subsequent Clearances that replaced entire communities with sheep farms. Resident numbers declined from over 20,000 in the early 19th century to just under 9,000 by the closing decade of the 20th century. The main industries are tourism, agriculture, fishing and whisky-distilling, and the largest settlement is Portree, known for its picturesque harbour. There are links to various nearby islands by ferry and, since 1995, to the mainland by a road bridge. The abundant wildlife includes the golden eagle, red deer and Atlantic salmon. Skye has provided the locations for various novels and feature films and is celebrated in poetry and song. (Full article…)

Skye is the largest island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Its peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country. The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic period and its history includes a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by Clan MacLeod (Dunvegan Castle, the clan’s seat, pictured) and Clan Donald. The 18th-century Jacobite risings led to the breaking up of the clan system and subsequent Clearances that replaced entire communities with sheep farms. Resident numbers declined from over 20,000 in the early 19th century to just under 9,000 by the closing decade of the 20th century. The main industries are tourism, agriculture, fishing and whisky-distilling, and the largest settlement is Portree, known for its picturesque harbour. There are links to various nearby islands by ferry and, since 1995, to the mainland by a road bridge. The abundant wildlife includes the golden eagle, red deer and Atlantic salmon. Skye has provided the locations for various novels and feature films and is celebrated in poetry and song. (Full article…)

English National Opera (ENO) is an opera company based in London, resident at the London Coliseum (pictured). Its productions are sung in English. The company’s origins were in the late 19th century, when the philanthropist Emma Cons, later assisted by her niece Lilian Baylis, presented theatrical and operatic performances at the Old Vic in a rough area of London for the benefit of local people. Baylis acquired and rebuilt Sadler’s Wells theatre in north London, which was better suited to opera than the Old Vic. The opera company grew there into a permanent ensemble in the 1930s and, after expansion required a move to the Coliseum in 1968, adopted its present name in 1974. Conductors associated with the company include Colin Davis, Reginald Goodall, Charles Mackerras, Mark Elder and Edward Gardner. ENO is known for its emphasis on the dramatic aspect of opera, with productions, sometimes controversial, by directors including David Pountney, Jonathan Miller, Nicholas Hytner, Phyllida Lloyd and Calixto Bieito. In addition to the core operatic repertoire, ENO has presented a wide range of works, from early operas by Monteverdi to new commissions, operetta and Broadway shows. (Full article…)

English National Opera (ENO) is an opera company based in London, resident at the London Coliseum (pictured). Its productions are sung in English. The company’s origins were in the late 19th century, when the philanthropist Emma Cons, later assisted by her niece Lilian Baylis, presented theatrical and operatic performances at the Old Vic in a rough area of London for the benefit of local people. Baylis acquired and rebuilt Sadler’s Wells theatre in north London, which was better suited to opera than the Old Vic. The opera company grew there into a permanent ensemble in the 1930s and, after expansion required a move to the Coliseum in 1968, adopted its present name in 1974. Conductors associated with the company include Colin Davis, Reginald Goodall, Charles Mackerras, Mark Elder and Edward Gardner. ENO is known for its emphasis on the dramatic aspect of opera, with productions, sometimes controversial, by directors including David Pountney, Jonathan Miller, Nicholas Hytner, Phyllida Lloyd and Calixto Bieito. In addition to the core operatic repertoire, ENO has presented a wide range of works, from early operas by Monteverdi to new commissions, operetta and Broadway shows. (Full article…)

Drymoreomys is a genus of rodents in the tribe Oryzomyini from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. The single species, D. albimaculatus, is known only from the states of São Paulo and Santa Catarina and was not named until 2011. It lives in the humid forest on the eastern slopes of the Serra do Mar and perhaps reproduces year-round. Although its range is relatively large and includes some protected areas, it is patchy and threatened, and the discoverers recommend that the animal be considered “Near Threatened" on the IUCN Red List. Within Oryzomyini, Drymoreomys appears to be most closely related to Eremoryzomys from the Andes of Peru, a biogeographically unusual relationship. With a body mass of 44–64 g (1.6–2.3 oz), Drymoreomys is a medium-sized rodent with long fur that is orange to reddish-buff above and grayish with several white patches below. The pads on the hindfeet are very well developed and there is brown fur on the upper sides of the feet. The tail is brown above and below. The front part of the skull is relatively long and the ridges on the braincase are weak. The palate is short, with its back margin between the third molars. Several traits of the genitals are not seen in any other oryzomyine. (Full article…)

Drymoreomys is a genus of rodents in the tribe Oryzomyini from the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. The single species, D. albimaculatus, is known only from the states of São Paulo and Santa Catarina and was not named until 2011. It lives in the humid forest on the eastern slopes of the Serra do Mar and perhaps reproduces year-round. Although its range is relatively large and includes some protected areas, it is patchy and threatened, and the discoverers recommend that the animal be considered “Near Threatened" on the IUCN Red List. Within Oryzomyini, Drymoreomys appears to be most closely related to Eremoryzomys from the Andes of Peru, a biogeographically unusual relationship. With a body mass of 44–64 g (1.6–2.3 oz), Drymoreomys is a medium-sized rodent with long fur that is orange to reddish-buff above and grayish with several white patches below. The pads on the hindfeet are very well developed and there is brown fur on the upper sides of the feet. The tail is brown above and below. The front part of the skull is relatively long and the ridges on the braincase are weak. The palate is short, with its back margin between the third molars. Several traits of the genitals are not seen in any other oryzomyine. (Full article…)

Bastion is an action role-playing video game produced by independent developer Supergiant Games. In the game, the player controls “the Kid” as he moves through floating, fantasy-themed environments collecting special shards of rock to power a structure, the Bastion, in the wake of an apocalyptic event. It features a dynamic voiceover from a narrator, and is presented as a two-dimensional game with an isometric camera and a hand-painted, colorful art style. The game debuted at the September 2010 Penny Arcade Expo, and it went on to be nominated for awards at the 2011 Independent Games Festival and win awards at the Electronic Entertainment Expo prior to release in July 2011. During 2011, the game sold more than 500,000 copies, 200,000 of which were for the Xbox Live Arcade. It was widely praised by reviewers, primarily for its story, art direction, narration, and music, although opinions were mixed on the depth of the gameplay. Bastion has won many nominations and awards since its release, including several for best downloadable game and best music. The soundtrack was produced and composed by Darren Korb, and a soundtrack album was made available for sale in August 2011. (Full article…)

Bastion is an action role-playing video game produced by independent developer Supergiant Games. In the game, the player controls “the Kid” as he moves through floating, fantasy-themed environments collecting special shards of rock to power a structure, the Bastion, in the wake of an apocalyptic event. It features a dynamic voiceover from a narrator, and is presented as a two-dimensional game with an isometric camera and a hand-painted, colorful art style. The game debuted at the September 2010 Penny Arcade Expo, and it went on to be nominated for awards at the 2011 Independent Games Festival and win awards at the Electronic Entertainment Expo prior to release in July 2011. During 2011, the game sold more than 500,000 copies, 200,000 of which were for the Xbox Live Arcade. It was widely praised by reviewers, primarily for its story, art direction, narration, and music, although opinions were mixed on the depth of the gameplay. Bastion has won many nominations and awards since its release, including several for best downloadable game and best music. The soundtrack was produced and composed by Darren Korb, and a soundtrack album was made available for sale in August 2011. (Full article…)

The reception history of Jane Austen follows a path from modest fame to wild popularity; her novels are both the subject of intense scholarly study and the centre of a diverse fan culture. Austen, the author of such works as Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1815), is one of the best-known and widely read novelists in the English language. During her lifetime, Austen’s novels brought her little personal fame; like many women writers, she published anonymously. At the time they were published, her works were considered fashionable by members of high society but received few positive reviews. By the mid-19th century, her novels were admired by members of the literary elite, but it was not until the 1940s that Austen was widely accepted in academia as a “great English novelist”. The second half of the 20th century saw a proliferation of scholarship exploring artistic, ideological and historical aspects of her works. As of the early 21st century, Austen fandom supports an industry of printed sequels and prequels as well as television and film adaptations, which started with the 1940 Pride and Prejudice and includes the 2004 Bollywood-style production Bride and Prejudice. (Full article…)

The reception history of Jane Austen follows a path from modest fame to wild popularity; her novels are both the subject of intense scholarly study and the centre of a diverse fan culture. Austen, the author of such works as Pride and Prejudice (1813) and Emma (1815), is one of the best-known and widely read novelists in the English language. During her lifetime, Austen’s novels brought her little personal fame; like many women writers, she published anonymously. At the time they were published, her works were considered fashionable by members of high society but received few positive reviews. By the mid-19th century, her novels were admired by members of the literary elite, but it was not until the 1940s that Austen was widely accepted in academia as a “great English novelist”. The second half of the 20th century saw a proliferation of scholarship exploring artistic, ideological and historical aspects of her works. As of the early 21st century, Austen fandom supports an industry of printed sequels and prequels as well as television and film adaptations, which started with the 1940 Pride and Prejudice and includes the 2004 Bollywood-style production Bride and Prejudice. (Full article…)

Aldfrith was king of Northumbria from 685 until his death on 14 December 704 or 705. He is described by early writers such as Bede, Alcuin and Stephen of Ripon as a man of great learning. Some of his works and some letters written to him survive. His reign was relatively peaceful, marred only by disputes with Bishop Wilfrid, a major figure in the early Northumbrian church. Aldfrith was born on an uncertain date to Oswiu of Northumbria and an Irish princess named Fín. Oswiu later became King of Northumbria; he died in 670 and was succeeded by his son Ecgfrith. Aldfrith was educated for a career in the church and became a scholar. However, in 685, when Ecgfrith was killed at the battle of Nechtansmere, Aldfrith was recalled to Northumbria, reportedly from the Hebridean island of Iona, and became king (coin pictured). In his early-eighth-century account of Aldfrith’s reign, Bede states that he “ably restored the shattered fortunes of the kingdom, though within smaller boundaries”. His reign saw the creation of works of Hiberno-Saxon art such as the Lindisfarne Gospels and the Codex Amiatinus, and is often seen as the start of Northumbria’s Golden Age. (Full article…)

Aldfrith was king of Northumbria from 685 until his death on 14 December 704 or 705. He is described by early writers such as Bede, Alcuin and Stephen of Ripon as a man of great learning. Some of his works and some letters written to him survive. His reign was relatively peaceful, marred only by disputes with Bishop Wilfrid, a major figure in the early Northumbrian church. Aldfrith was born on an uncertain date to Oswiu of Northumbria and an Irish princess named Fín. Oswiu later became King of Northumbria; he died in 670 and was succeeded by his son Ecgfrith. Aldfrith was educated for a career in the church and became a scholar. However, in 685, when Ecgfrith was killed at the battle of Nechtansmere, Aldfrith was recalled to Northumbria, reportedly from the Hebridean island of Iona, and became king (coin pictured). In his early-eighth-century account of Aldfrith’s reign, Bede states that he “ably restored the shattered fortunes of the kingdom, though within smaller boundaries”. His reign saw the creation of works of Hiberno-Saxon art such as the Lindisfarne Gospels and the Codex Amiatinus, and is often seen as the start of Northumbria’s Golden Age. (Full article…)

Bronwyn Oliver (1959–2006) was an Australian sculptor, whose works were primarily made in metal. Raised in rural New South Wales, she trained at Sydney’s College of Fine Arts (COFA) and London’s Chelsea School of Art. She settled in Sydney, where she practised and taught until her death by suicide in 2006. Oliver’s sculptures are admired for their tactile nature, their aesthetics, and the technical skills demonstrated in their production. In her later career, most of her pieces were commissions, both public and private. Her major works include Vine, a 16.5-metre high (54 ft) sculpture in the Sydney Hilton, Palm (pictured) and Magnolia in the Sydney Botanical Gardens, and Big Feathers in Brisbane’s Queen Street Mall. Recognition of her work included selection as a finalist in the inaugural Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award in 2000, inclusion in the National Gallery of Australia's 2002 National Sculpture Prize exhibition, and being shortlisted for the 2006 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award. Her works are held in major Australian collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales. (Full article…)

Bronwyn Oliver (1959–2006) was an Australian sculptor, whose works were primarily made in metal. Raised in rural New South Wales, she trained at Sydney’s College of Fine Arts (COFA) and London’s Chelsea School of Art. She settled in Sydney, where she practised and taught until her death by suicide in 2006. Oliver’s sculptures are admired for their tactile nature, their aesthetics, and the technical skills demonstrated in their production. In her later career, most of her pieces were commissions, both public and private. Her major works include Vine, a 16.5-metre high (54 ft) sculpture in the Sydney Hilton, Palm (pictured) and Magnolia in the Sydney Botanical Gardens, and Big Feathers in Brisbane’s Queen Street Mall. Recognition of her work included selection as a finalist in the inaugural Helen Lempriere National Sculpture Award in 2000, inclusion in the National Gallery of Australia's 2002 National Sculpture Prize exhibition, and being shortlisted for the 2006 Clemenger Contemporary Art Award. Her works are held in major Australian collections, including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales. (Full article…)

Pinguicula moranensis is a perennial rosette-forming insectivorous herb native to Mexico and Guatemala. A species of butterwort, it forms summer rosettes of flat, succulent leaves up to 10 centimeters (4 in) long, which are covered in mucilaginous (sticky) glands that attract, trap, and digest arthropod prey. Nutrients derived from the prey are used to supplement the nutrient-poor substrate in which the plant grows. In the winter the plant forms a non-carnivorous rosette of small, fleshy leaves that conserves energy while food and moisture supplies are low. Single pink, purple, or violet flowers appear twice a year on upright stalks up to 25 centimeters (10 in) long. The species was first collected by Humboldt and Bonpland on the outskirts of Mina de Morán in the Sierra de Pachuca of the modern-day Mexican state of Hidalgo on their Latin American expedition of 1799–1804. Based on these collections, Humboldt, Bonpland and Carl Sigismund Kunth described this species in Nova Genera et Species Plantarum in 1817. It remains the most common and most widely distributed member of the Section Orcheosanthus, and has long been cultivated for its carnivorous nature and attractive flowers. (Full article…)

Pinguicula moranensis is a perennial rosette-forming insectivorous herb native to Mexico and Guatemala. A species of butterwort, it forms summer rosettes of flat, succulent leaves up to 10 centimeters (4 in) long, which are covered in mucilaginous (sticky) glands that attract, trap, and digest arthropod prey. Nutrients derived from the prey are used to supplement the nutrient-poor substrate in which the plant grows. In the winter the plant forms a non-carnivorous rosette of small, fleshy leaves that conserves energy while food and moisture supplies are low. Single pink, purple, or violet flowers appear twice a year on upright stalks up to 25 centimeters (10 in) long. The species was first collected by Humboldt and Bonpland on the outskirts of Mina de Morán in the Sierra de Pachuca of the modern-day Mexican state of Hidalgo on their Latin American expedition of 1799–1804. Based on these collections, Humboldt, Bonpland and Carl Sigismund Kunth described this species in Nova Genera et Species Plantarum in 1817. It remains the most common and most widely distributed member of the Section Orcheosanthus, and has long been cultivated for its carnivorous nature and attractive flowers. (Full article…)

Skye is the largest island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Its peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country. The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic period and its history includes a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by Clan MacLeod (Dunvegan Castle, the clan’s seat, pictured) and Clan Donald. The 18th-century Jacobite risings led to the breaking up of the clan system and subsequent Clearances that replaced entire communities with sheep farms. Resident numbers declined from over 20,000 in the early 19th century to just under 9,000 by the closing decade of the 20th century. The main industries are tourism, agriculture, fishing and whisky-distilling, and the largest settlement is Portree, known for its picturesque harbour. There are links to various nearby islands by ferry and, since 1995, to the mainland by a road bridge. The abundant wildlife includes the golden eagle, red deer and Atlantic salmon. Skye has provided the locations for various novels and feature films and is celebrated in poetry and song. (Full article…)

Skye is the largest island in the Inner Hebrides of Scotland. Its peninsulas radiate from a mountainous centre dominated by the Cuillins, the rocky slopes of which provide some of the most dramatic mountain scenery in the country. The island has been occupied since the Mesolithic period and its history includes a time of Norse rule and a long period of domination by Clan MacLeod (Dunvegan Castle, the clan’s seat, pictured) and Clan Donald. The 18th-century Jacobite risings led to the breaking up of the clan system and subsequent Clearances that replaced entire communities with sheep farms. Resident numbers declined from over 20,000 in the early 19th century to just under 9,000 by the closing decade of the 20th century. The main industries are tourism, agriculture, fishing and whisky-distilling, and the largest settlement is Portree, known for its picturesque harbour. There are links to various nearby islands by ferry and, since 1995, to the mainland by a road bridge. The abundant wildlife includes the golden eagle, red deer and Atlantic salmon. Skye has provided the locations for various novels and feature films and is celebrated in poetry and song. (Full article…)

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